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Filter the documents by selecting your target country or topic of interest from the field above. Countries not listed are out of the scope of this project. If you'd like a country to be included in a future version, please use the forum to let us know.

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Leading in India

In this article, we will look at what leadership style works in India, which cultural values play a role behind the scenes and some key factors that you must learn to become a successful leader in India.
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India innovation opportunities

This document provides a short overview of innovation aspects, business opportunities and challenges in India. It will also give advice on best practices for starting and developing an innovative business venture, considering India’s context. 
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Can you Lead in India?

A Swedish carmaker opened an assembly plant in Pune, India. Adrian, who has been a highly successful manager in Sweden, was sent to India to set up and lead a team of engineers. He planned to recreate the team culture and working practices that had yielded brilliant results and motivated the whole team in Sweden. He believed in creating and enabling an atmosphere for his team where everyone puts forward their ideas and issues, and together they agree on a way forward for the whole team. He would consult with all layers of his team, above and below, to make sure everyone had their say before decisions concerning them were made. He never felt the need to follow up or chase his team, as once the decision was made, everyone went on with their tasks until they needed some help, or it was completed. If there was an issue, he expected the team members to show up at his door and ask for his help. This way of working was both accepted and expected by Adrian and his team in Sweden without the need to ever talk about it. Before Adrian travelled to Pune, India, he used the help of his Indian colleagues to select his team members. He would be directly leading a team of 12 engineers. On his first day in the plant, Adrian set up a team meeting with his new team. He had years of experience setting up and managing new teams. After the initial introductions around the table and sharing some of his experiences from Sweden, Adrian went straight to business, asking the team to share their ideas on how they would like him to run the team and share their best practices. The team was quiet and looked at each other. Thinking maybe they did not understand the question, he repeated himself but with the same result. He tried to probe further by asking individuals, but most of the responses he received were more questions than suggestions. He was taken back by this, feeling that maybe they were not as competent as he had expected. Over the coming weeks, Adrian was getting surprised every day; some surprises he liked, others he did not. He understood that team meetings were very quiet, and he had to do most of the talking. This improved after a few weeks, but still, the communication wasn’t fluid enough for him. He did not like that every time he tried to ask for feedback and analyse further into ongoing issues during team meetings, the concerned individuals were quiet and even uncomfortable. He was happy that all his team members were always positive about taking over a new task, and everyone helped each other during projects. But he had some experiences where the assigned task was not completed on time, and he was not told about the potential delay until the deadline was around the corner. His team worked hard, and it was common for them to spend time at work beyond the usual working hours. During one project, his team was working with the Swedish design team to produce and test a new car part. This project was of a high strategic value to the company. Adrian was on two days' holiday. During his absence, the Swedish team asked the team in Pune to make minor adjustments to the design and re-create the product. When he came back, he found his inbox full of escalation emails from the Swedish team. They were not happy that the Indian team did not deliver any work, even though they acknowledged the need for it during their meeting. Adrian set up an emergency team meeting and condemned his whole team for being unprofessional and letting everyone down. The whole team felt disappointed as they did not understand what the issue was. They had merely waited for Adrian to take the important decision. The senior management were also not happy with the outcome of the project and started doubting Adrian’s value in leading the team in India.    After 6 months into his role, Adrian decided to move back to Sweden. He was left questioning his leadership and management style that had worked so well for years, but he just could not replicate the results in India.
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Changing Business Landscape of India

The Indian business scenario is interestingly dynamic and constantly changing. This changing landscape together with a complex national culture, which is driven by an interesting mix of western and eastern values, begs the business leaders and professionals to acquire greater insights and understanding of Indian business and, more importantly, Indian way of conducting business, for their growth and success in this country. This article attempts to look at different scenarios in the Indian business landscape as well as the need to recognize the critical role culture plays in succeeding in these environments.
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Knowledge on India

What are the most lucrative and innovative sectors for the startup ecosystem in India? Do people from India appreciate punctuality less than Europeans? Not sure about the answers? Take this CUBE IN quiz and learn more!  
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Meetings and behaviour in business context in India

As with most matters in this highly diverse and contrasting culture, knowing your place in the cultural mosaic that is India is crucial. The goal of this document is to give some specific details on how to behave in business context and in meetings in India, what to do and what to not do.  
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Negotiation in India

This article attempts to provide insights into how Indian Culture and working practices of Indian organizations influence the negotiation process in India. This document also highlights potential pitfalls and derailers a businessperson particularly from the western world should try to stay clear of while dealing with his counterpart from India. It explores ways to make the negotiation process more effective from Indian cultural nuance perspective, leading to a possible Win.
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Where innovation meets culture

Why should I read this document? 
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Building trust and relationships in India

Trust and relationships often have different meanings in different cultures and for Europeans doing business in India, this difference in meanings may be more pronounced than otherwise. This document, written by an Indian interculturalist living in India, gives useful guidelines on how to approach trust and relationships in the subcontinent.
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Find, Attract and Retain employees and partners in India

The document gives pointers about finding the right employees and partners for your business, what their motivators are, what the ideal management style is and how to establish and maintain a relationship with the team.
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Customer needs and behaviour in India

With 1.3 bn people whose affluence is growing exponentially, India is an attractive market for consumer goods and services providers the world over. Who is the quintessential Indian consumer and what does he expect when he spends money? What cultural peculiarities does one keep in mind while targeting the Indian consumer? 
Webinar

Doing business in India

A fast developing economy, a growing middle class and a very young workforce in India has made global businesses vie for a piece of the Indian pie. However, for these very reasons, India can be a complex cultural puzzle to solve, especially due to its extremely heterogeneous population. Generational, linguistic, professional, religious and socio-economic differences within the country make it a glaring mosaic of contrasts, paradoxes and mazes and understanding these can be key to succeeding in the country.

Join Divya Susan Varkey and Nadir Karanjia, Associate Partners of Hofstede Insights in India, to learn more about the nuances of Doing Business in the Indian Subcontinent.

 

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E-Learning India

In this e-learning, you will learn from your hosts Divya and Nadir will teach you the "why" behind some of the most frequently encountered issues and give you tips and tricks for a successful venture in India.
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How has digitalized farming and innovation in agriculture saved farmers from poverty in India?

This document provides an overview of how digitalized farming and innovation in agriculture have enhanced productivity and helped Indian farmers mitigate poverty.
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How to win a business assignment in India

The goal of this document is to give some specific details on how business is conducted in India and give a few pointers on how to do and win it. What should be highlighted and some aspects of Indian culture that might help you win. 
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India and Machine Tools: Learning Circle for European SMEs

As a part of CUBE IN, ICUnet developed a training and mentoring package for European SMEs that want to reach out to emerging markets like India. This Learning Circle taking place in Bangalore was about India and the Machine Tools sector.  
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India – a land of many contradictions

India is vast. India is diverse. Hearts of 1 billion people, with numerous ethnicities and large differences in socio-economic conditions, may all beat together, but their aspirations, dreams, demands, and expectations are varied. ‘Diversity in unity’ being the mantra here, navigating India and the Indian business landscape needs a multidimensional view. This document attempts to provide the readers with these varying perspectives, and contradictions that influence society and business in this great land with 5000+ year old civilization. 
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India – a land of many contradictions

  One size does not fit all. True in every sphere of real life; truer and more critical in conducting business in a vast country with many stories!  
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Indian Jugaad - Learning Circle for European SMEs in the Mobility Sector

As a part of CUBE IN, ICUnet developed a training and mentoring package for European SMEs that want to reach out to emerging markets like India. Seven European SMEs participated in this Learning Circle about Indian Jugaad in the mobility sector in Mumbai and Bangalore.       
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Learning Circles for European SMEs - India Jugaad

Within the overall project “Capturing innovation impulses from emerging economies”, EISMEA organized learning circles for European SMEs innovating in emerging markets. Here you'll find reports and recordings of the programme Learning Circles in India Jugaad.
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Managing wastewater treatment in India

India has the second largest population in the world. As the country races towards a more developed economy, one of the casualties has been the deteriorating state of the environment. Rapid industrialisation has, unfortunately, increased pollutants in the surrounding areas. One of these pollutants is wastewater. In this document, you will find information about innovation and current development of wastewater treatment in India, and also more about business activities in wastewater treatment in India and the contribution of EU in India.
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Prospect of Hydroelectricity as a Potential Substitute for Non-Renewable Energy – India

This document will offer a brief overview of the current hydroelectric power industry and its development in India. Here you can find information on trends and applications of hydroelectric power development and on how the EU has contributed to this sector in India. 
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The Impact of Disruptive Innovation to Businesses in India

In this document, you will learn more about the innovation ecosystem in India and EU-India collaboration in innovation. You will also find here more insights on the best practice of local businesses particularly related to disruptive innovation.  
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